Six myths about vaccination – and why they’re wrong

The myth that vaccines are somehow linked to autism is an unsinkable rubber duck. Initiated in 1998 following the publication of the now notorious Lancet paper, not-a-Dr Andrew Wakefield was the first to suggest that the measles mumps rubella MMR vaccine might be linked to autism.What he didn’t reveal was that he had multiple conflicts of interest including that he was being paid by lawyers assembling a class action against the manufacturers of MMR, and that he himself had submitted an application for a patent for a single measles vaccine.

via Six myths about vaccination – and why they’re wrong.

Jenny McCarthy, Anti-Vaccination Movement to Blame for Whooping Cough

Maybe… just maybe… ex-Playboy Playmates aren’t the ideal source for medical information.

There’s a reason that we associate the whooping cough with the Dickensian: It is. The illness has, since the introduction of a pertussis vaccine in 1940, has been conquered in the developed world. For two or three generations, we’ve come to think of it as an ailment suffered in sub-Saharan Africa or in Brontë novels. And for two or three generations, it was.

Until, that is, the anti-vaccination movement really got going in the last few years. Led by discredited doctors and, incredibly, a former Playmate, the movement has frightened new parents with claptrap about autism, Alzheimer’s, aluminum, and formaldehyde. The movement that was once a fringe freak show has become a menace, with foot soldiers whose main weapon is their self-righteousness. For them, vaccinating their children is merely a consumer choice, like joining an organic food co-op or sending their kids to a Montessori school or drinking coconut water.

via Jenny McCarthy, Anti-Vaccination Movement to Blame for Whooping Cough | New Republic.

The Top 5 Bogus Public Health Scares – Vaccines and Autism

In 1998 the British researcher Andrew Wakefield claimed in The Lancet that he had identified an association between vaccination against measles, mumps, and rubella MMR and the onset of autism. Thus was launched one of the more destructive health scares of recent years, in which tens of thousands of frightened parents refused to have their children vaccinated. Anti-vaccine cheerleaders such as the actress Jenny McCarthy fanned those fears.

Years of research and numerous studies have thoroughly debunked this scare. For example, the Institute of Medicine issued a 2011 report, “Adverse Effects of Vaccines,” that found no association between MMR vaccination and autism.

via The Top 5 Bogus Public Health Scares – Reason.com.