Dad Seeks Longer Eligibility for Young Athletes With Special Needs

Special Needs kids often take longer to get through high school than others. And that can mean that, by the time they’re seniors, they’re classified as too old to participate in certain activities. But a dedicated dad in Michigan is looking to change that.

It happened to my daughter, who didn’t get to compete on the varsity bowling team her senior year because she’d aged out. And it’s scheduled to happen to Eric Dompierre, a 19-year-old junior with Down syndrome who competes in football and basketball for his Michigan high school. But although I just grumbled about it and wrote ticked-off blog posts, Eric’s dad is setting out to change the rules, putting up a petition on Change.org that’s gathered more than 73,000 signatures. Read Dean Dompierre’s explanation of the situation, and if you think the current rules are unfair — and indeed, strike at the heart of the sort of inclusion we long to see for our kids — add your name to the petition.

via Dad Seeks Longer Eligibility for Young Athletes With Special Needs.

25 Signs Your Child’s Inclusion Classroom Is for Real

From About.com’s guide to children with special needs:

Inclusion is the big buzzword for students in special education, and many schools have embraced the concept and brought students out of self-contained classes and into mainstream classes where every type of learner is valued.. Many other schools have pretended to do so to get the government and pushy parents off their back, and have implemented the program about as well as you’d expect under those circumstances. How do you know your child’s inclusion classroom is the real thing? Look for these 25 signs that there’s something good going on…

via Inclusion Done Right — 25 Signs Your Child’s Inclusion Classroom Is for Real.