Parenting Roundabout: Structuring the Summer

Summer presents a challenging amount of time to fill for any parent, but when your child needs routine and structure to make it through the day, finding predictable ways to fill that time is a particular concern. Terri chats with Charlie Zegers, who writes about sports and also about parenting kids on the autism spectrum, about strategies for a successful summer, including camps that can accommodate your child, structured time at home, and activities like bowling, fishing, kayaking, going to movies, catching a baseball game, and maybe even taking in some theater.

via Parenting Roundabout.

Parenting Roundabout Podcast: Kids, Computers, and Unacceptable Age-Appropriateness

On the one hand, as parents of kids with special needs, we’re desperate for them to do the things their age peers are doing. We want them to be adept at the tools of the world today and fluent in the language of our times. On the other hand, don’t lie and stop cursing and don’t make secret social media accounts, and get away from that computer and stop playing video games and put down that phone. Amanda chats with Charlie Zegers, who writes about sports and also about parenting kids on the autism spectrum, about how you tease out what’s the condition and what’s the age, and how to discipline without stamping out important developmental progress. Are we expecting more from kids on the autism spectrum than we’d expect from typical kids, as About.com’s autism expert Lisa Jo Rudy asked in an article on her site? Or should we be expecting more from typical kids? Listen in for some good food for thought on parenting on and off the spectrum (and if you’re interested in getting your kids coding, the sites referred to are Scratch and Game Salad). If you’re reading this somewhere without hyperlinks, come to http://parentingroundabout.com for the full recap experience.

via Parenting Roundabout: Round 4: Kids, Computers, and Unacceptable Age-Appropriateness.

Parenting Roundabout: Varsity Letters and Good Intentions

Remember the story that was going around Facebook about a young athlete with special needs whose mom bought him a varsity letter jacket and whose school made him stop wearing it? Amanda had a chat with Charlie Zegers, who writes about sports and also about parenting kids on the autism spectrum, on whether buying a kid a letter to honor participation on a non-varsity team is something parents ought to be doing, however well-meaning and understandable such an effort may be. They talked about the meritocracy of sports, what a varsity letter signifies, how appropriating such a symbol may stir bad feelings along with good ones, and why there may also be unintended consequences to extending eligibility so that students in special education who get to high school a little older than their peers and stay longer can keep playing.

via Parenting Roundabout.